APIS Announces Website Redesign

Website Redesign

The Alcohol Policy Information System (APIS), a project of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), has completed a major redesign of its public website.  The design and structure of the site was revised to improve security, enhance usability, and improve access to APIS data.  Major improvements include the following.

  • New left-side and header menus;
  • A revised Policy Changes at a Glance section allowing users to view policy changes by topic, jurisdiction, or year;
  • Improved graphics; and
  • Map and chart “table views” allowing users to view and export map and chart data in table form.

Update of APIS Policy Topics

APIS has also completed its latest annual update of State-by-State alcohol and recreational cannabis policies.

This update reports on substantive changes in State alcohol and recreational cannabis policy statutes and regulations that occurred though January 1, 2017.

Highlights relating to the annual update include the following:

Underage Drinking:

  • Tennessee made two changes to its Blood Alcohol Concentration Limits law pertaining to minors:
    • The upper age limit applicable to the 0.02 BAC Limit law was reduced from 21 to 18 years of age, effective July 1, 2016;
    • The upper age limit applicable to the 0.02 BAC Limit law was increased from 18 to 21 years of age effective September 19, 2016. Thus, the BAC Limit of 0.08 was applicable to drivers at least 18 years of age for the period July 1, 2016 through September 18, 2016.
  • Connecticut added a requirement to its Age of Seller–Off-Premises law to require a manager or supervisor to be present when an underage person sells alcohol.
  • Nebraska reduced its minimum age to sell beer, wine, and distilled spirits off-premises from 19 to 16.
  • Indiana added a provision to its False Identification law allowing retailers to seize apparently false IDs.

Retail Sales:

  • Colorado added a Mandatory Training requirement for Licensees, Managers, and Server-Sellers to its Beverage Service Training law.
  • Pennsylvania amended its Beverage Service Training law to require training by Servers/Sellers.

Taxation

  • Kentucky decreased the Wholesale Tax Rate for Beer and Wine.  Each decreased from 10.75 to 10.50 percent.
  • Louisiana increased the Specific Excise Tax Rates on Beer, Wine, and Distilled Spirits.
    • For Beer, the Specific Excise Rate went from $0.32 to $0.40 per gallon. 
    • For Wine, the Specific Excise Rates went from $0.11 to $0.76 per gallon, and for Wine with an alcohol content of 6% or less, the rate increased from $0.32 to $0.40 per gallon.
    • For Distilled Spirits, the Specific Excise Rate increased from $2.50 to $3.03 per gallon.

Pregnancy and Alcohol

  • Louisiana added data gathering as a specified purpose of its Mandatory Reporting Requirements law.
  • New York added data gathering as a specified purpose of its Mandatory Reporting Requirements law.

Alcohol Beverages Pricing

  • Delaware and Virginia repealed the Free Beverage prohibitions in their Drink Specials laws.
  • Delaware altered its Wholesale Pricing law by repealing the Five-day Minimum Hold Period for posted wholesale Beer, Wine, and Distilled Spirits prices.
  • Michigan reduced the Minimum Hold Period for posted wholesale Beer prices from 180 days to 90 days.

Alcohol Control Systems

  • Ohio made two changes to its Alcohol Control System laws:
    • Beer containing more than 12 percent ABV was added to the retail license distribution system.
    • Beer containing more than 12 percent ABV was added to the wholesale license distribution system.
  • Pennsylvania added wine between 0.50 percent ABV and 24 percent (undefined) to its retail license distribution system.

Recreational Cannabis Policy

  • Alaska altered provisions of its Recreational Use of Cannabis laws as follows:
    • Retail Sales for On-Premises Consumption and Pricing Controls were added.
    • Cultivation Restrictions were added.
    • An additional $15 per ounce “remainder of plant” producer-level Tax was added.
  • In California, Recreational Use of Cannabis was legalized and related provisions to implement the law were added.  Additionally, the low end of the range applicable to Cultivation Restrictions was reduced from <=5,000 square feet to 501 square feet.
  • In Massachusetts, Recreational Use of Cannabis was legalized and related provisions to implement the law were added.
  • In Nevada, Recreational Use of Cannabis was legalized and related provisions to implement the law were added.
  • In Oregon, two changes were made to the State’s Recreational Use of Cannabis laws:
    • The number of license types applicable to Cultivation Restrictions increased from 4 to 8.
    • The low end of the range applicable to Cultivation Restrictions was reduced from <=5,000 square feet to <=625 square feet.

These and other changes to current APIS policy topics are now posted to the site found at:  https://alcoholpolicy.niaaa.nih.gov/ .  Many are consistent with the goal of reducing underage drinking and cannabis use and its consequences, as well as the goal of reducing alcohol and cannabis-related death and injury in the general population.

This project is funded with Federal funds from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHSN275201800002C.